Download One-Click CFD v1.1 (011)

One Click CFD - From CAD to Simulation in one-click

 Why One-Click CFD?

KVRC is involved in One-Click CFD for two reasons.

Firstly, the Challenge is about learning about racing car design. The One-Click CFD tool aims to provide a simple setup for participants to access, use and benefit from CFD software at no cost and with no requirement for prior CFD knowledge.

Secondly, our former partner Hibou Scientific Software is gone under. One-Click CFD builds upon what was developed at Hibou Scientific Software, but tailored to KVRC.

What is One-Click CFD?

As described by its name, One-Click CFD is a bare-bone software tailored for vehicle aerodynamic to enable the setup and start of a CFD analysis with just one-click

One-Click CFD is not a self-contained CFD software, but rather a framework supported by open-source software, including openFoam as a CFD engine. One-Click CFD only runs on Windows.

A word of caution: setting up of third party tools and One-Click CFD may not be as straightforward as setting up and starting the analysis. And a lot of user actions is required for post-processing.

Installation

Third Party

One-Click CFD uses open-source third party software, which have to be manually installed:
  • If you want to use the Amazon EC2 cloud: PuTTY is used to provide remote copy and shell functionalities and 7-zip is used to compress data prior to transferring;
  • ParaView is required to allow for solution based mesh refinement and for manual post-processing (by you);
  • Meshlab is required for mesh cleaning for solution based mesh refinement;
  • ImageMagick is required for image processing when assessing frontal area;
  • gnuplot is required for 2D graph plotting;
  • OpenMPI for Windows 64bit to enable multi-processor (aka parallel) processing for the CFD solver;
  • openFoam for Windows 64bit for meshing and CFD solver.
The following table lists for each tool where it can be downloaded from and where it should be installed on your system:

  Download from Install at
PuTTY http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/ C:\Program Files (x86)\PuTTY
or
C:\Program Files\PuTTY
 7-zip http://www.7-zip.org/   C:\Program Files (x86)\7-Zip
or
C:\Program Files\7-Zip
ParaView
(supported version: v3.98.0, v3.98.1, v4.1.0, v.4.2.0, v4.3.0, v4.3.1, v4.4 - but recommend v3.98.0)
http://www.paraview.org/download/  C:\Program Files (x86)\ParaView x.x.x
or
C:\Program Files\ParaView x.x.x
 Meshlab http://meshlab.sourceforge.net/  
C:\Program Files (x86)\VCG\MeshLab
or
C:\Program Files\VCG\MeshLab 
 ImageMagick  http://www.imagemagick.org/script/binary-releases.php#windows  C:\Program Files (x86)\ImageMagick-6.9.1-Q16
or 
C:\Program Files\ImageMagick-6.9.1-Q16
 gnuplot http://www.tatsuromatsuoka.com/gnuplot/Eng/winbin/   C:\Program Files (x86)\gnuplot
or
C:\Program Files\gnuplot
openFoam (blueCFD-Core-2.3) http://joomla.bluecape.com.pt/index.php?option=com_remository&Itemid=47&func=select&id=45
C:\OpenFOAM
 If parallel simulation does not work, try downloading MPSMPI - thanks to Alexander for the informationhttps://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36045  Use the default installation directory

openFoam distribution that meets all the required criteria - free, recent and supporting parallel analysis - is difficult to come by. https://openfoamwiki.net/index.php/Installation/Windows has a reasonably extensive list of options in addition to the above free option which includes snappyHexMesh and parallel meshing.

Amazon AWS

Amazon AWS is a cloud computing service, which provides both data storage and computing server. It is a great alternative for persons with limited computational resources or a large number of simulations to run. Expect simulation costs in the order of $2-3 per simulations. Do monitor simulations to ensure that they do not run uneccessarily.

One-Click CFD can be coupled with Amazon AWS to automatically set-up and start the CFD simulation on Amazon AWS. One-Click CFD will start an Amazon EC2 instance type M3.LARGE and expect approximate CFD simulation run-time of no more than 10 hours. When the simulation is complete, the Amazon EC2 instance automatically shutdown and the results are stored on Amazon S3 to enable you to download it when you are ready. When the CFD simulation has started, there is no need to keep you computer on.

If you are interested in using Amazon AWS, do the following:
  • Register on Amazon AWS at http://aws.amazon.com/ The One-Click CFD simulation do not fall under the Free-Tier system, unfortunately...
  • Create a Key Pair, convert the PEM file to PPK using PuTTY Gen and make a copy of the PPK file;
  • Make a note of your AWS Access and Secret Keys.

Installation

The One-Click CFD setup installer can be downloaded from here. Then, follow the prompts to install.

Once installed, you will notice a new entry
One-Click CFD when right-clicking on a file or directory in the File Explorer. This is the only GUI...

User Guide
View the slideshare presentation left for a more complete guide. Below is a short summary:
                            1. Prepare your geometry using your favorite CAD tool;
                            2. Export the geometry in STL format using meter units and the naming convention described in the slideshare presentation;
                            3. Open a File Explorer window to the file or directory;
                            4. Right click and select the One-Click CFD analysis required.
If the run locally option is selected, the CFD simulation is run in the file folder and will create:
a) A log file with the name oneClickCFD-....log which contains the CFD meshing and solver output;
b) A directory with the name oneClickCFD-... which contains the CFD solver solution to be post-processed manually using ParaView.

If solving on Amazon AWS, the CFD simulation results are compressed in an archive that is stored on Amazon S3 for retrieval at a convenient time. A file onClickCFD-monitor.bat is created in the file folder to assist with the monitoring and retrieval of the simulation results archive. While the Amazon EC2 instance is supposed to self-shutdown, it is good practice to regularly monitor and ensure that no instance is left running unnecessarily.